175. Colorful Cuties


The movie “Finding Nemo” has catapulted the clown fish, to fame and admiration, it had enjoyed never before. There are thirty different species of clown fish in various colours namely yellow, orange, red, maroon, blue and even black. Three vertical white stripes add colour and glamour to these tiny fish, which are merely 2 to 5 inches long.

The colour and endless energy of the fish has earned it, the name “Clown Fish”. These fish live in the warm water of Pacific Ocean, Red Sea and Indian Ocean. They live in perfect safety, among the poisonous tentacles of the Sea Anemones, swimming non-stop all the time. It is believed that clown fish develops a slimy covering, which protects the fish from the poisonous tentacles.

The Sea Anemone and the clown fish share the most successful “Symbiotic Relationship” in which both the partners stand to gain mutually. Clown fish lures the other fish near the sea anemones, using its bright colours and by swimming around in it.

After the sea anemone paralyses the fish and eats it, the clown fish polishes off all the uneaten portions as well the dead tentacles of the anemone. The sea anemone gives the clown fish protection from the predators.

The little known and the most amazing ability of the clown fish is to change it sex. If a female dies, the most predominant male morphs into a female and chooses a new male partner to breed and lay eggs. The eggs are laid in large numbers, near the safety of the sea anemone on a coral or a rock. The tiny fish emerging from the eggs are taken care of by their father, till they become independent.

Even though orange clown fish have become the best known variety, thanks to Nemo, there are many colours and sizes in which these fish appear. There are hundreds of varied markings and colour combinations.

The fish apparently “clowning around tirelessly” is in fact protecting its territory from the other competitors. It may look like a joker, but it is the most serious guardian of its home!

Visalakshi Ramani

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s